Permalink

0

Aus unseren Neuerwerbungen – Anglistik 2021.6

Dreams, sleep, and Shakespeare’s gen­resThis book explores how Shake­speare uses images of dreams and sleep to define his dra­mat­ic worlds. Sur­vey­ing Shakespeare’s come­dies, tragedies, his­to­ries, and late plays, it argues that Shake­speare sys­tem­at­i­cal­ly exploits ear­ly mod­ern phys­i­o­log­i­cal, reli­gious, and polit­i­cal … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

Aus unseren Neuerwerbungen – Anglistik 2021.4

Idioms and ambi­gu­i­ty in con­text: phrasal and com­po­si­tion­al read­ings of idiomat­ic expres­sionsIdioms have long been of inter­est to research in lin­guis­tics as well as lit­er­ary stud­ies. In the exist­ing research, how­ev­er, the aes­thet­ic pro­duc­tiv­i­ty of idiomat­ic ambi­gu­i­ty has nev­er been … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

The Myths and Legends Podcast › Scandinavian Legends: „Madness“

„The sto­ry that inspired Shakespeare’s Ham­let, the tale of Amleth, the prince of Den­mark. A ton of death, some cryp­tic non-rid­­dles, and copi­ous amounts of poop smear­ing serve as the start­ing point for one of the great­est works in the … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

Aus unseren Neuerwerbungen – Anglistik 2021.2

Jane Austen and William Shake­speare: a love affair in lit­er­a­ture, film and per­for­manceThis vol­ume explores the mul­ti­ple con­nec­tions between the two most canon­i­cal authors in Eng­lish, Jane Austen and William Shake­speare. The col­lec­tion reflects on the his­tor­i­cal, lit­er­ary, crit­i­cal and … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

Podcasts zu Shakespeare

Uni­ver­si­ty of Oxford: „Approach­ing Shake­speare“ Each lec­ture in this series focus­es on a sin­gle play by Shake­speare, and employs a range of dif­fer­ent approach­es to try to under­stand a cen­tral crit­i­cal ques­tion about it. Rather than pro­vid­ing over­ar­ch­ing read­ings or … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

Aus unseren Neuerwerbungen – Anglistik 2020.7

The rise of Vic­to­ri­an car­i­ca­tureThis book serves as a retrieval and reeval­u­a­tion of a rich haul of com­ic car­i­ca­tures from the tur­bu­lent years between the Reform Bill cri­sis of the ear­ly 1830s and the rise and fall of Char­tism in … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

Aus unseren Neuerwerbungen – Anglistik 2020.4

Shake­speare and mon­eyThe essays col­lect­ed in this vol­ume are evi­dence that in con­tem­po­rary par­lance the notion of ‘mon­ey’ is often con­nect­ed with the idea of glob­al econ­o­my and ‘cul­tur­al glob­al­iza­tion’: they prompt aware­ness of the grow­ing impor­tance of col­lapsed trade … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

Kennen Sie schon … die Netzwerk-Visualisierungen zu Shakespeares Tragödien?

Mar­tin Grand­jean, ein Schweiz­er His­torik­er und Dig­i­­tal-Human­i­ties-Wis­sen­schaftler sowie Experte für Net­zw­erk­analy­sen und ‑visu­al­isierun­gen, hat sich die elf Tragö­di­en Shake­spear­es vorgenom­men: Are Shakespeare’s tragedies all struc­tured in the same way? Are the char­ac­ters rather iso­lat­ed, grouped, all con­nect­ed? Nar­ra­tion, even fic­tion­al, … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

BBC Radio 4 „In our time“ zu „A Midsummer Night’s Dream“

„Melvyn Bragg and guests dis­cuss one of Shakespeare’s most pop­u­lar works, writ­ten c1595 in the last years of Eliz­a­beth I. It is a com­e­dy of love and desire and their many com­pli­ca­tions as well as their sim­plic­i­ty, and a reflec­tion … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

Kennen Sie schon … das Video- und Performance-Archiv „Global Shakespeares“ des MIT?

„The Glob­al Shake­spear­es Video & Per­for­mance Archive is a col­lab­o­ra­tive project pro­vid­ing online access to per­for­mances of Shake­speare from many parts of the world as well as essays and meta­da­ta pro­vid­ed by schol­ars and edu­ca­tors in the field. The idea … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

SWR2 Wissen: „Klassiker der Schullektüre: Macbeth – William Shakespeare und die Gier nach Macht“

„Shake­speare for­mulierte in „Mac­beth“ eine Urfa­bel über Macht­gi­er, Mord und die sich fort­set­zende Gewalt. Oder ist die Tragödie gar keine War­nung vor dem Fluch der bösen Tat?“ (SWR, Eber­hard Fal­cke) Sie kön­nen die Sendung, die 2018 in der Rei­he „SWR2 … Weit­er­lesen

Permalink

0

WDR ZeitZeichen zu August Wilhelm Schlegel

„„Gut gebrüllt, Löwe“, „Es war die Nachti­gall und nicht die Lerche“, „Der Rest ist Schweigen“ – Es gibt eine Menge Redewen­dun­gen, die August Wil­helm Schlegel der deutschen Sprache eingeprägt hat: beson­ders grif­fige Stellen aus seinen Shake­speare-Über­set­zun­gen.17 Stücke hat Schlegel ins … Weit­er­lesen